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Is it vintage if nobody knows?

March 17, 2010

I recently completed this blouse for the SWAP on Artisan’s Square. The pattern was Hot Patterns Plain & Simple Princess Shirt – my third version, so that pattern is a firm TNT. The fabric was a lightweight cotton, said to originate in Germany. It is NICE STUFF – comes out of the dryer without needing ironing. The fabric had two good sides, so I used my favorite of the body of the shirt, and the more contrasty reverse for the collar, facing, and turn-ups on the sleeves. It looks pretty mumsy on the dressform as photographed. I’ll probably wear it belted.

So much for the project description. Let’s talk buttons.

Check out the non-descript, classic button. Ho-hum, right? Yet, these were special buttons; there were six of them on a card with really dated graphics, including a price that indicated they were from a long time ago. They are vintage buttons, but without the card they came on, who would ever know?

I used them because they were the only set of black buttons in the stash. Iwas snowed in at the time, and really wanted to finish my shirt. Did I do wrong? They were the right size, style and color for the project, but they were really of more interest when they were intact on their card. However, if I had left them there, they never would have fulfilled their buttoning destiny.

When something is this classic, is it worth preserving as a relic? If an object is vintage, but you can’t tell by looking at it, does its mere age give it value?

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. Hatty permalink
    May 9, 2010 5:55 pm

    My old grandaddy used to make buttons by hand back in the thirties when plastics were still pretty new. He would have been outraged at the idea of buttons perishing on a card forever. Use’em. I opened a fifty-or-so years old pacxk of needles the other day and I’m using them. My granny would expect it of me!

  2. July 25, 2010 8:52 pm

    I think that the function of buttons is to be used. If you will get a bit of enjoyment over their “vintageness” that is a plus. But unless you are a button collector, keeping them unused serves no purpose.

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